Allen Memorial Art Museum

Founded in 1917, the Allen Memorial Art Museum is recognized today as one of the five best college and university art museums in the United States.

The collection is housed in an impressive Italian Renaissance-style building designed by Cass Gilbert and named after Dr. Dudley Peter Allen, a distinguished 1875 graduate of Oberlin College. Dr. Allen and his wife Elisabeth Severance Allen (later Prentiss) were the principal benefactors of the new museum.

Chinese
Northern Qi Dynasty (550-577)
This statue depicts the historical Buddha Sakyamuni standing placidly with his hands held out in a gesture of compassion and reassurance. A sacred object of veneration originally, it was intended to attract worshippers to the temple in which it stood.

Thomas Thornycroft
(English, 1815-1885)
Equestrian Statue of Queen Victoria, 1853

Book of Hours, ca. 1450-1480
Medieval books of hours brought together psalms, prayers, and other sacred texts for private devotional use by Catholics. The presence of several English saints in this Flemish volume, such as Edward of England, Oswald of York, and Edith of Wilton, suggests it was produced for an English market.

Chinese
Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)
Statue of Guanyin Seated on a Mythological Beast

Oberlin Stained Glass Tour: Rust United Methodist

Friends of Lorain County Sacred Landmarks Initiative is sponsored a tour of ecclesiastical stained glass in Oberlin on Sunday, October 14, 2007. I was fortunate enough to make this trip. Always had a special place in my heart for stained glass, as you probably saw in my St. Nicholas post. We toured seven churches, and given the time constraints that we had, I did my dangedest to get some good shots. Light was good and bad, so while I shot everything there was, not all of it came out. Sorry. But what did, I’d like to share.

This was one of my favorite stops, Rust United Methodist Church.

Memorial Arch in Tappan Square, Oberlin College

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I am grieved by the war and have not slept.”

“Who has the strength to right Heaven and earth?”

Those words are inscribed on a plaque given by the Class of 1994, in memory of the Chinese citizens killed in the violence of 1900. The Memorial Arch was originally dedicated in spring 1903 in commemoration of the Oberlin missionaries killed in the Chinese Boxer Rebellion.